Tag Archives: Transgender

TWIH Episode 80: Learning from Where You’re At with Pat Mosley #hb2

by

In this episode we talk with Pat Mosley, a Gardnerian witch in North Carolina. We talk about how Wicca takes on the culture of where it’s at, and how it’s not that much of a stretch for people to be multi-faith practitioners. Pat discusses his coven, Granny Magick, and his involvement in CUUPs. We also talk politics and #HB2 (also known as the “bathroom bill”) and how, on the ground in North Carolina, there are more people who are against it rather than for it. Pat talks about the uphill battle in challenging their state government and the disconnect of their elected leaders from the people they represent.

Note: After recording this podcast in May, and after another blow up around  transgender women in women’s only spaces (primarily concerning Budapestian Dianic Witchcraft), Pat has announced a call for submissions for a anthology called “Arcane Perfection”. You can click here for more information.

Pat Mosley is a Weirdo Inspired to Create Here (WITCH). He writes semi-regularly at Patheos Pagan, but more of his work can be found at his website. Pat is a Gardnerian Witch, and is currently conspiring to author a book on one Appalachian coven’s vision of Wicca in the next year or so. Pat is also a coordinator for Mountain CUUPs (Covenant of Unitarian Universalist Pagans) in Boone, North Carolina–where everyone is welcome to share a meal and sing a spell.

Links

http://www.patheos.com/blogs/commontansy/

https://patmosley.wordpress.com/

https://mtncuups.wordpress.com

[iframe style=”border:none” src=”//html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/4480161/height/150/width/480/thumbnail/yes/render-playlist/no/theme/custom/custom-color/4039a9″ height=”150″ width=”480″ scrolling=”no” allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen oallowfullscreen msallowfullscreen]
Click here to open a player in a new window.

TWIH Episode 68: The Unnamed Path, Gender Identity, and Body Image with David Shorey and Chase Powers #pantheacon

by

In this episode we talk to David Shorey and Chase Powers, both members of the Unnamed Path, a magickal tradition for Men Who Love Men. What is the Unnamed Path? Why is single gendered space important to some people? Why do people get stuck on the gender binary, and why do people get bent out of shape when people want more inclusivity in single-gender spaces (i.e.: inclusion of transgender, bisexual, multi-faith, etc.)? What is the importance of language in gendered space? And…what about Beltane?

 

Note: Apologies for the Skype noise. Skype was not being our friend during the interview!

 

This episode is part of a series of interviews with people who will be presenting at Pantheacon 2016.

 

David Shorey is an Initiate and Teacher of The Unnamed Path, a spiritual tradition for men-who-love-men. In addition, David is a student of Druidry and member of the Order of Bards, Ovates, and Druids. He is also an Apprentice in Faery Seership under Orion Foxwood. David lives in San Diego with his two partners, Tommie and Virgil, and their dog Murphy. 

 

Chase Powers is an Initiate and teacher of the Unnamed Path, and a student of Anderson Feri, currently living in Houston, Texas. Between spiritual work, video games, and graphic design, he still finds time to fight

with people on the internet and make bad jokes.

 

 

Links

 

David’s Email: drshorey@gmail.com

 

Website: www.unnamedpath.com

 

The Unnamed Path Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/unnamedpath/

[iframe style=”border:none” src=”http://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/4142454/height/150/width/480/thumbnail/yes/render-playlist/no/theme/custom/custom-color/4039a9″ height=”150″ width=”480″ scrolling=”no” allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen oallowfullscreen msallowfullscreen]
Click here to open a player in a new window.

TWIH Episode 66: Wholeness and Humanness with Laine DeLaney #pantheacon

by

Laine DeLaney joins us in this episode to talk about her journey from her childhood religion of Islam to her current Heathen and magickal traditions.  What does it mean to be a Heathen? Do you have to be of Northern European descent to be a “proper Heathen”? Is there really such a thing as an “unbroken” tradition? Why is hospitality important? We also talk about how accepting people as they identify themselves and accepting their humanness is important in accepting the “Other.”

This is part of a series of interviews with people who will be presenting at Pantheacon 2016.

Laine DeLaney was born in Western New York and has spent much of her life trying to escape its pull, but recently has made a new home in San Diego, California. She has been a member of several traditions and has acted as a clergyperson, spiritual guide, and seeress for various groups and communities. Laine writes for pleasure (science fiction on her Empyrean Dreams blog and other random fiction), for profit (as a custom content creator), for activism (in her columns in various LGBT publications), to discuss Pagan issues (on The Lady’s Quill on Patheos Pagan and Pagan Church Lady on WordPress), and because she has difficulty stopping.

Links

Email: lainedelaney919@gmail.com

Website: Pagan Church Lady

Pagan Church Lady on Facebook

[iframe style=”border:none” src=”http://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/4103741/height/150/width/480/thumbnail/yes/render-playlist/no/theme/custom/custom-color/4039a9″ height=”150″ width=”480″ scrolling=”no” allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen oallowfullscreen msallowfullscreen]
Click here to open a player in a new window.

30 Days of Social Justice 24: Hate Crime #30daysofsocialjustice #amwriting

by

The FBI defines hate crime as the following:

A hate crime is a traditional offense like murder, arson, or vandalism with an added element of bias. For the purposes of collecting statistics, Congress has defined a hate crime as a “criminal offense against a person or property motivated in whole or in part by an offender’s bias against a race, religion, disability, ethnic origin or sexual orientation.” Hate itself is not a crime—and the FBI is mindful of protecting freedom of speech and other civil liberties.

You’d think hate crimes would be pretty obvious. Take the Charlestown, SC, Emmanuel AME Church shooting. Given witness accounts, it seems pretty clear that this was a race-motivated hate crime. And yet, we have all of these people who are trying to dismiss the racist, hate motivated aspects of the shooting. If had been a person of color, a muslim, or someone other than Dylan Roof, it would have been called what it was: a hate crime. But because it’s a white person, it was because he was “mentally disturbed” (and let’s not forget the ablism aspects of that particular assessment). If the victims had been white Jews in a synagogue, it would have also been immediately labeled a hate crime. If it had happened at a mosque? The media would have had the attitude of “well, that’s what you get for being a Muslim.” What if it had been a group of transgender people? If you look at the definition, transgender people are excluded because there is no provision for gender and gender identity. Transgender people are murdered in a way that most sane people would consider a hate crime, but these hate crimes rarely get investigated because transgender hate crimes are invisible, even under law.

We have a very myopic view of hate crime in this country. As a country, we are failing to protect our own people and people are dying. But, until our government sees people as real human beings rather than monolithic “enemies,” profit centers, and numbers, and educates the public accordingly, hate crimes will continue.

30 Days of Social Justice 21: Transgender/Transphobia #30daysofsocialjustice #amwriting

by

In 2011 the Circle of Cerridwen dropped a social justice bomb about transgender issues on Pantheacon.

In 2012, because of the work we did in 2011, we published an anthology entitled “Gender and Transgender in Modern Paganism” (which is a free PDF download, or you can buy a paper copy slightly above cost). We also did a big open discussion/ritual so that people could express their feelings around these issues. Afterwards, Z. Budapest wrote some pretty hateful stuff on my blog, to which my wife had a beautiful response.

After these two events, we saw, much to our surprise and happiness, many people and groups (such as CAYA coven and P. Sufenas Virius Lupus) take up the banner and create space in the pagan community that is welcoming to all genders and sexual orientations. It’s not perfect, and there’s still plenty of work to do, but it has been amazing to see just how much the paradigm has shifted.

I’m proud of the work that my coven did around transgender acceptance. As a coven, we’ve moved on to doing more support for other people doing the work and we’ve also moved more into teaching about radical inclusion. But our commitment to supporting transgender, gender variant, and agender people still remains a core part of who we are, and we hope we’re setting a good example for other groups to follow.

30 Days of Writing about Social Justice. Who’s in? #amwriting #30daysofsocialjustice

by

Tuesday I’m going to start writing about this little list of social justice topics. I was inspired by the Month of Written Devotion (which I have now fixed to the proper link) and created 30 days (because 30 days have September). True, this isn’t everything and I know there could have been way more topics on here. Feel free to substitute topics or mush topics together. I’m not that fussy about what folks do with this list!

Really, it’s your writing for 30-odd days. I’m more curious about what I, and others, will write about these things. Feel free to link back here because I’d love to read what you’ve written. I might even use some of the topics for The Heretic Speaks vlog (instead of writing).

I’ll also admit, for full disclosure, that I’m writing a book that includes pretty much all of these topics, and some of my writing during this time my end up in it. It’s all my wife’s fault, really, because she told me to do the thing.

So I did the thing.

Anywho, here’s the list of topics. Feel free to pass it around on the Twitters, the Tumblrs, and the Facebooks!

1. Social Justice
2. Diversity
3. Marginalized
4. Oppression
5. Gender
6. Classism
7. Bias
8. Dialogue
9. Identity/Labels
10. Intersectionality
11. Privilege
12. Stereotypes
13. Tolerance
14. Worldview
15. Dominant Culture
16. Multiplicity/Multi-identity
17. Cultural Appropriation
18. Ableism/Accessibility
19. Ageism/Adultism
20. Body Shame/Policing
21. Transgender/Transphobia
22. Calling Out
23. Misogyny
24. Hate Crime
25. Patriarchy
26. Racism
27. Microaggressions/Trigger Warnings
28. Sexism
29. Sexual/Affectional Orientation/Asexuality
30. Radical Inclusion

 

Good luck, and I look forward to seeing what you and I write!

30 Days of Social Justice Writing Prompts #amwriting #30daysofsocialjustice

by

I’ve been watching folks do the Month of Written Devotion the last couple of months which has been really cool. I thought, earlier today: “Huh…I wonder if there’s something similar for social justice?” My Google-fu and asking on Twitter has failed me, and my wife (not so subtly) suggested that I should do it.

So I did.

The idea is that for each day for 30 days you write about the topics listed. To be honest, I’m not really fussed how you all decide to work on these. Feel free to write on more than one of these a day or spread it out for 30 weeks, or whatever. I’ll be starting mine on September 1. Maybe we can use the hashtag #30daysofsocialjustice? You’re welcome to announce that you’re doing it in the comments (and you can pingback, too).

These terms aren’t in any particular order, but they are many of the terms I see floating around the social justice blogs and other places:

  1. Social Justice
  2. Diversity
  3. Marginalized
  4. Oppression
  5. Gender
  6. Classism
  7. Bias
  8. Dialogue
  9. Identity/Labels
  10. Intersectionality
  11. Privilege
  12. Stereotypes
  13. Tolerance
  14. Worldview
  15. Dominant Culture
  16. Multiplicity/Multi-identity
  17. Cultural Appropriation

  18. Ableism/Accessibility
  19. Ageism/Adultism
  20. Body Shame/Policing
  21. Transgender/Transphobia
  22. Calling Out
  23. Misogyny
  24. Hate Crime
  25. Patriarchy
  26. Racism
  27. Microaggressions/Trigger Warnings
  28. Sexism
  29. Sexual/Affectional Orientation/Asexuality
  30. Radical Inclusion

Good luck, and I look forward to read what folks write!

TWIH Episode 53: Learning from History: South Africa, Ferguson, and Dialog with Rev. Wilma Jakobsen #blacklivesmatter

by

In this episode we talk to Rev. Wilma Jakobsen, the first ordained woman in the Anglican Church of Southern Africa, and an anti-apartheid activist during the worst, and last years, of apartheid South Africa. We not only talk about her story, but we also talk about her reactions to Ferguson, and working through white privilege. We also talk about the future of not only her home country, but of the civil rights movement here in America. What does it mean, as a white person, to be a witness and ally to the experiences of People of Color? What does it mean when we say people are equal in the eyes of God?

Wilma Jakobsen was born in Cape Town, South Africa of immigrant parents from Denmark and Britain. She earned a Bachelor of Science from the University of Cape Town, worked as a high school physical science and math teacher, then came to the United States in 1984 to attend Fuller Seminary, Pasadena.

After obtaining her Master of Divinity from Fuller, she returned to South Africa to be ordained as a deacon. Four years later, when the Anglican Church of Southern Africa finally allowed it, she became the first female priest ordained by Archbishop Desmond Tutu. She worked for 15 years in the Diocese of Cape Town, in parishes in black townships, university towns, the cathedral, a rural parish with fishing and farming communities, and a 19-month stint as chaplain to Archbishop Tutu. During the apartheid years she was an anti-apartheid activist in church and faith based organizations, which crystallized her conviction of the connection between faith and social justice.

In 1997 she obtained a Master of Sacred Theology from Union Theological Seminary, New York. She was the Anglican chaplain at the University of Cape Town for six years, then joined the staff of All Saints Church, Pasadena in 2003, serving most recently as  Senior Associate for Children, Youth & Families, Students & Young Adults.  She is passionate about  the integration of spirituality in all areas of life, and her belief that “ ministry built on a solid basis of prayer, relationships, loving pastoral care, mutual ministry with priest and people as equals, contemplation and action, creativity, Eucharist and social action, can transform people’s lives.”

Links

St. Jude’s Episcopal Church, Cupertino, CA: http://saintjudes.org

Wilma’s Email: wilma@saintjudes.org

[iframe style=”border:none” src=”http://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/3726055/height/150/width/480/thumbnail/no/theme/standard” height=”150″ width=”480″ scrolling=”no” allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen oallowfullscreen msallowfullscreen]
Click here to open a player in a new window.

TWIH Episode 49: Queering the Conversation and Planting Seeds with Monica Joy Cross #blacklivesmatter #transvisibility

by

Monica Joy Cross joins us in this episode to talk about her experiences as a transgender Person of Color in a primarily white denomination. What do we need to do to have the conversation about race in our society? Do we need a more radical solution? How do we, both black and white, see beyond our personal experiences to see the systems that keep us in this cycle of mutual destruction and create change? How do we create the Kingdom of God in us to create the Kingdom of God around us?

 

Monica Joy Cross is a Transgender Scholar-Activist who serves as an Associate Minister at Tapestry Ministries, Disciples of Christ, Christian Church in Berkeley, Ca.  Monica received a Masters in Divinity from Pacific School of Religion in 2012 and a Masters in Religious Leadership for Social Change from Starr King School for the Ministry in 2014.  Her Journey with the Holy has led her from the citadels of conservatism to the liberal bastions of enlightenment and queer realities.  Monica is a Board Member of The Community Collaborative Planning Council of Alameda and Contra-Costa County for policy and allocation of funding in the San Francisco Bay Area around HIV/AIDS; the Founder of Global Prayer Network and a Different Imagination for a Just and Sustainable Humanity; has authored: Reflections of a Prophet Without Honor – a book of reflections which emerge from her life with God; Authenticity and Imagination in the Face of Oppression – Autobiographical, it addresses gender , race, religion, sexuality, and strategies towards liberation due to be released in September 2015; and has a Blog entitled: The Transgender Scholar.   While being a native of Southern California Rev. Monica Cross currently makes her home in Richmond, California. 

 

Links

 

Monica’s Facebook

Email: 

Blog: http://transgenderscholas.blogspot.com/

[iframe style=”border:none” src=”http://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/3626826/height/150/width/480/thumbnail/no/theme/standard” height=”150″ width=”480″ scrolling=”no” allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen oallowfullscreen msallowfullscreen]
Click here to open a player in a new window.

TWIH Episode 48: Inclusive Wicca with Yvonne Aburrow

by

What is inclusive Wicca? In this episode we talk to author Yvonne Aburrow about her new book  “All Acts of Love and Pleasure: Inclusive Wicca” which was also recently reviewed on The Wild Hunt. How does this manifest in traditional British Wicca? How has the craft evolved over the years? Why do people still cling to these outmoded and outdated traditions, and why are they so resistant to change? 

Yvonne Aburrow has been a Pagan since 1985 and a Wiccan since 1991. She has an MA in Contemporary Religions and Spiritualities from Bath Spa University, and lives and works in Oxford, UK. Her most recent book is “All Acts of Love and Pleasure: Inclusive Wicca”. She has also written four books on the mythology and folklore of trees, birds, and animals, and two anthologies of poetry. She is genderqueer, bisexual, and has been an anarchist socialist green leftie feminist for the last thirty years.

Links

Patheos blog: http://www.patheos.com/blogs/sermonsfromthemound/author/yvonne/

YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKSb364RP4H16lXpBHGiSmQ

Review on The Wild Hunt: http://wildhunt.org/2015/05/book-review-all-acts-of-love-and-pleasure-inclusive-wicca.html

 

Books

“All Acts of Love and Pleasure: inclusive Wicca” Publisher’s Page: http://avaloniabooks.co.uk/catalogue/wicca-witchcraft/inclusivewicca/

All Acts of Love and Pleasure: Inclusive Wicca (Amazon Link)

Other Books By Yvonne Aburrow

[iframe style=”border:none” src=”http://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/3610696/height/150/width/480/thumbnail/no/theme/standard” height=”150″ width=”480″ scrolling=”no” allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen oallowfullscreen msallowfullscreen]
Click here to open a player in a new window.

%d bloggers like this: